The Violin’s Secret

(6 customer reviews)

$10.00

Dr. Young once took a class on the Holocaust, where many of the students believed that only six million Jews died at the hands of Hitler and his henchmen during World War II. Yes, six million did die, because Satan wanted to wipe them from off the face of the earth. Five million other undesirables were killed as well: Catholics who hid Jews, Christians who protested too much about the regime, political prisoners who didn’t fit the Party ideals, Poles, Russians, and other Slavic races that did not have value under the Aryan mythology.

The Violin’s Secret tells the story of a young child forced to grow up quickly into a young man. He had to learn daily how to handle the anticipation of death. Besides not being Jewish, he and his family were taken to the Death Camp called Dachau for crimes committed against the Reich. But with a secret, he survives and later gains a full life outside of that trauma, yet with immeasurable guilt. In the present, he understands that it is time to share this secret with his family.  He wants his family to have a knowledge of his life as a child that they will never forget. Before his life passes into the next he has an incredible story to tell.

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A Violin’s Secret

Dr. Young once took a class on the Holocaust, where many of the students believed that only six million Jews died at the hands of Hitler and his henchmen during World War II. Yes, six million did die, because Satan wanted to wipe them from off the face of the earth. Five million other undesirables were killed as well: Catholics who hid Jews, Christians who protested too much about the regime, political prisoners who didn’t fit the Party ideals, Poles, Russians, and other Slavic races that did not have value under the Aryan mythology.

The Violin’s Secret tells the story of a young child forced to grow up quickly into a young man. He had to learn daily how to handle the anticipation of death. Besides not being Jewish, he and his family were taken to the Death Camp called Dachau for crimes committed against the Reich. But with a secret, he survives and later gains a full life outside of that trauma, yet with immeasurable guilt. In the present, he understands that it is time to share this secret with his family.  He wants his family to have a knowledge of his life as a child that they will never forget. Before his life passes into the next he has an incredible story to tell.

WWII

The Holocaust

Prisoners

What Inspired You to Write It?

One day in 1991 I was watching one of the countless documentaries upon WWII. I saw an image of Auschwitz which chilled me; actually, one I had seen many times before but you know when you see it as it was in history. There were rows and rows of symmetrical bunks for thousands of unfortunate Poles, Russians, Jews, Gypsies and other prisoners who opposed in one way or another the Nazi evil that resided in the hearts of normal men who accomplished unspeakable acts. This was the beginning of a short story that later led to a 120 page novel that it is today.

Vision of Why?

God always has a purpose for Why He places creation in one’s heart. I saw the powerful images in the Holocaust Museum in DC. I made my family wait more than an hour longer than they worked through the exhibits while I smelled an actual train that souls died within Germany meant for cattle. The film at the top and the beginning of the exhibits indicated that Germans believed that the Jews had killed Jesus and therefore all Christians believe that Jews are responsible for this death. This is a short sided view that only some have adopted for sure, but real Christians embrace the Jewish heritage of God’s people listed in the Bible. They didn’t kill Jesus, all did throughout time if you begin to understand Scripture. I chose to show a story of a Christian family that worked to save one Jewish family and lost the fight. It is backed up with real history of true heroes to Jewish families that are alive today for a few brave individuals who risked all to save a life.

Why are There Revisionist’s Histories?

The longer an event recedes from the mind of the viewer, the other storytellers want to rush in with their own stories. This occurs with Christian issues, histories and interpersonal relationships. Truth is not in the eye of the beholder necessarily; perspective plays a heavy role in truth retellings.

There are elements in all societies that wish to change the past so that one does not look so bad. This is the major reason for revision of history. One of the interesting characteristics of the Bible is that the characters within them are filled with their own petty lusts, greeds and other variety of failings common to man. Some will intimate that the victors write the histories, and while that is true to some extent; all histories must be examined without bias. Bias is a very hard discussion for all. I have them and so do you. Honesty in one’s bias is the beginning of the truth in a retelling though. I pray that with this book “The Violin’s Secret” one truth of the facts of the Holocaust and WWII will be forever burned into the reader’s memory.

Ernst

Ernst is a preadolescence boy living in Nazi Germany. His father is a craftsman and a strong Christian bringing character with a firm hand in the lad. Ernst has fallen for his beautiful teacher who has encouraged him to grow educationally and spiritually. His violin follows him wherever he goes and ultimately keeps him alive in Dachau.

Influence on Dr. Young in his Adolescence

A lady named Marie Winship terrified the young Scott when he was 13. She was a teacher’s aide in English who was remembered for her severity and little else. When he student taught at 23 years old, she was still at Parker Junior High in Parker, Colorado in the same position. He had the honor to spend most of two days with her listening to stories growing up in Nazi Germany as a Hitler Youth. She told him that after the war, she was extremely distraught over the lies of the Nazi regime. Several times she tried to kill herself as a young adult even trying to open a plane door to float to her death. This story is partially dedicated to the memory of Marie.

6 reviews for The Violin’s Secret

  1. Amazon Customer

    A unique and enthralling story of one child’s survival through an unimaginable time in our history. The hardships suffered by the prisoners of Dachau come to life in this vivid depiction pitting the powerless against the brutally cruel, and reveals how strong the human spirit can be when coupled with one’s faith in God.

  2. Amazon Customer

    It took a few pages to get into the book, but then I was hooked. I pulled an all-nighter because I couldn’t put it down.

  3. Dr. Jesse Grillos

    The construct of the story pulls you in… you become part of the story – seeing the world as Ernst did, feeling his pride, anger, fear, betrayal, heartbreak and final triumph. Even after having read it days ago, I cannot shake the thoughts and experiences of this young boy living through hell.

    This an important book which furthers the necessary reminder of what we cannot as humanity, ever forget, allow to be dismissed or swept under the “rug” of our collective history. The growing evil pervading our global mindset would have the facts of the Holocaust removed from our consciousness, ultimately lending to the future potential of it repeating and much, much worse.

    Thank you for standing up for the millions who died, survived, as well as the families, friends and supporters of the victims of the evil perpetrated on these, our fellow human beings.

    Dr. Jesse Grillos

  4. Remembering True History

    In this day and age when historical revisionism is in vogue, we need to take moments and remember the truth about history least anyone come and try to remove it by presenting their `version’ of history which has a hidden agenda. Even with fictional characters this is a quality reminder of the true history that of recent past and will worth the time and money.

  5. Annie

    This powerfully heartfelt story portrays the unimaginable hardships of a generation and their strength to battle through it. The imagery and the metaphorical use of music brings more depth to the novel’s characters, as well as a deeper emotional connection with the audience.

  6. C. Cathleen Wells

    The book quickly turns into a great story of survival. It portrays the Holocaust from the view of an unexpected participant and is told in a way that is both unique and engaging. A must-read for any Holocaust enthusiast or to anyone curious about the trials endured by the Holocaust’s victims.

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